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519 Numbers...

Barryere
Great Citizen / Super Citoyen

Hi,

 

First of all, I'm not sure if this is the proper topic area for this question, so if not... move it, I guess.

 

Is there a chance in the future we could get/pick 519 numbers? I'd prefer 519 over 226 as petty as it may seem.

35 REPLIES 35


@Barryere wrote:

 


A landline from Bell or Cogeco is about $50-60 either way, whether that includes LD or not I have no idea. If I had to guess, they'd likely make you pay even more for LD and $50-60 is criminal as it is.

 


I just had a look at bell.ca and they're advertising $44.44 for a landlline - local calling only, no features LOL


@computergeek541 wrote:

@Barryere wrote:

 


A landline from Bell or Cogeco is about $50-60 either way, whether that includes LD or not I have no idea. If I had to guess, they'd likely make you pay even more for LD and $50-60 is criminal as it is.

 


I just had a look at bell.ca and they're advertising $44.44 for a landlline - local calling only, no features LOL


I feel bad for anyone who does that.... carytel $4.99, teksavvy $9.99 per month


@slash407 wrote:

people still have landlines? and at 40 bucks a pop. Hard to believe


I still have a Bell landline at home.  I don't have the exact number, but I'm pretty sure it comes out to $35/month, tax already added in, but this would be a grandfathered price plan from long ago. 

 

There actually used to be reason for people to keep landlines.  I'll say that the POTS landline relibility is still miles ahead of any VoIP or cellular line when it comes to reliability.  This is coming from someone who had multiple problems with the landline, but once Bell fixed it (they replaced the NID after complaining of the line constantly going down), it's been rock solid for years.  The other reason was because DSL service costed more on a dry loop, so if you to replace this landline with a $20 Public Mobile unlimited calling plan, the savings would vanish because of that added fee for the internet connection.   I'm aware that dry loop fees are usually waived now.

 

 

The only reason I wish I still had a POTS connection, emergency services.

 

POTS work in power outages.  You must have a non powered direct connection to the service.  For $45 per month, I just can’t afford that safety convienne.

Chipster
Good Citizen / Bon Citoyen

Both Cogeco and Bell have offered VOIP for years. In fact Cogeco first partnered with Telus to offer VOIP services.

Barryere
Great Citizen / Super Citoyen

I've told my family about Public Mobile several times.

 

My moms on it, don't know how long that'll be since it's not postpaid. Told my brother but he's apparently happy with textNow/textPlus. And my dad just uses his company phone as his personal phone since he barely ever calls anyone - and he showed me that with his phone history, 99% business contacts.

 

He has a VOIP line but it doesn't work very well and I think this is because his internet is **bleep**ty (6mbps). Speaking of which, I do not recommend anyone try Nettalk, I'm not sure if I'm right about the internet speed but Nettalk is very unreliable; incoming calls don't always ring, outgoing calls don't always call out, and if someone is using too much internet out of that 6mbps your voice and/or the recipient's voice cuts out constantly. And my dad's solution to ask everyone to stop downloading rather than getting a better connection. Smiley Mad We aren't rich by any means but he could definitely afford to get decent internet.

 

I know VOIP has worked great for me. I used Fongo on my smartphone and as a home phone with my own internet, never had a problem with the home phone but the app may disconnect which I find is solely dependant on your internet gear.

Barryere
Great Citizen / Super Citoyen

Landlines are technically more reliable in contrast to VOIP lines as people think they work when the power goes out and there is no internet, but this is only because there is a battery in the phone itself... once that dies (30 minutes or so) you are without a phone.

 

I'd rather have both a cell phone and VOIP line, but I rent a room and have enough plugged into my walls. Smiley LOL


@Barryere wrote:

Landlines are technically more reliable in contrast to VOIP lines as people think they work when the power goes out and there is no internet, but this is only because there is a battery in the phone itself... once that dies (30 minutes or so) you are without a phone.

 

I'd rather have both a cell phone and VOIP line, but I rent a room and have enough plugged into my walls. Smiley LOL


Well...unless you have a *corded* landline phone.

cordedphone.jpg

Not shown is the cord to the wall plug of course.

 

I haven't proven this for obvious reasons but I seem to think I've heard that even if you don't have landline service but you do have a landline connection that the line is alive to do a 911 call.

Depending on where you live, have a look around for alternative ISP's right now as they may have some deals going on for the Christmas season. IN BC we can subscribe to Cancom for internet that costs much less than Shaw Cable.  Good luck.

@z10user4, this is what I was attempting to say.  Thanks for clarifying.

 

Cordless land lines are useless as the base station requires power, the handset requires power.

 

The old wall mounted phone in the kitchen growing up had power delivered to it over thee POTS system.