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Mayor / Maire

Re: ANDROID PHONES AND CUSTOM ROM/FIRMWARE

@srlawrenprogramming a CDMA varient is weird (as above posters show, none of the normal codes will be accepted)

 

I know with Bell / Telus CDMA phones you MUST enter the MSL in order to open the programming screen

Otherwise Bellus phones(even those with SIMs) were locked out from North America roaming and could only use GSM on international carriers

 

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Retired Oracle / Oracle Retraité

Re: ANDROID PHONES AND CUSTOM ROM/FIRMWARE


@kav2001c wrote:

@srlawrenprogramming a CDMA varient is weird (as above posters show, none of the normal codes will be accepted)

 

I know with Bell / Telus CDMA phones you MUST enter the MSL in order to open the programming screen

Otherwise Bellus phones(even those with SIMs) were locked out from North America roaming and could only use GSM on international carriers

 


@kav2001c this is getting a bit above my head, but regardless the phone's specs clearly list support for 850MHz and 1900MHz UMTS.  It's physically capable of working with PM.  If Sprint has done something to mangle or impede it, I can't speak to that. The last CDMA phone I had was around a decade ago, when I left my Storm 9530 behind for an HSPA Bold 9700 and never looked back.  


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Mayor / Maire

Re: ANDROID PHONES AND CUSTOM ROM/FIRMWARE


@MoreYummy wrote:

However each ROM has its own bugs, so need to keep changing to the one that suite you.


This applies to all ROMs, firmware, operating systems, and apps.  Not just to aftermarket or third-party or opensource ones, but also to the default factory stuff the OEM installed on the phone (along with all their updates).

 

It's nice to have the latest and greatest stuff, true ... but for me flashing a weekly update is a bit excessive.  My philosophy is to not break what already works, updates don't appeal to me unless they increase performance or enable more features/functionality or fix bugs/flaws or add compatibility with stuff I actually use (or plan to use).  A bunch of fancy new techbabble and version numbers which don't actually do anything useful just aren't worth my time and effort to keep at peak.  Other people have different opinions, needs, wants, and approaches, though, which are not less valid than mine.

 

Be aware that while the manufacturer's ROMs (and updates) might be full of bloat and junkware and telemetry (spyware), they at least assure full compatibility and full functionality with all the things they've built into the device.  Other ROMs from other sources are sometimes better in specifics and sometimes even better overall but also quite often have "unfinished" or "broken" components (such as operating the Bluetooth, WiFi, camera, or whatever other hardware) ... and they vary from version to version and device to device.  What works perfectly on one device may be a lousy choice on another.

 

I'm also skeptical about ROMs which promise performance improvements.  Some do, at least in some benchmarks.  Most don't.  As clean and clever as they may be, they are typically still forced to implement software/firmware workarounds for things the manufacturer was able to hardcode into the device - code running close to the hardware layers (in the "bare metal") will always run faster, and small code always runs faster, always, so the manufacturer often has an edge and savvy manufacturers actually leverage this advantage strongly.