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Re: Network sharing explained!

@McBryen Check this wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telus_Mobility#LTE

Also, have look at the coverage maps:  https://publicmobile.ca/en/on/coverage and http://www.telus.com/en/on/mobility/network/coverage-map.jsp

As a general rule, Bell & Telus share towers where they each lack coverage. We like to refer to them as Belus towers. Robot LOL


>>> ALERT: I AM NOT A MODERATOR. JE NE SUIS PAS MODERATEUR.
Good Citizen / Bon Citoyen

Re: Network sharing explained!

Thanks Luddite!

 

What I was looking for is any confirmation on if Public Mobile has access to the 2600MHz band if using a Bell Tower?

 

I see Telus has coverage in my city, but I don't know what part of their map represents the 2600MHz LTE band. It may be that they are receiving full access through another LTE band from Bell. The public mobile map provides no distinction between the frequencies. 

 

The reason I ask this rather odd question is because I saw mentioned in posts that Telus does not operate on 2600MHz for Bell towers (in a few cases, that information may be dated now).

 

TL;DR - There are Bell towers operating on 2600MHz near my house. Is there any reason that my 'future' phone, that supports FDD-LTE B1/B3/B5/B7/B8, will not connect to this?

Deputy Mayor / Adjoint au Maire

Re: Network sharing explained!

Hi @McBryen
When Bell initially launched LTE B7, it wasn't shared with Telus. It has since been shared with Telus as of a few years ago. You won't have any issues.
Model Citizen / Citoyen Modèle

Re: Network sharing explained!


@McBryen wrote:

Thanks Luddite!

 

What I was looking for is any confirmation on if Public Mobile has access to the 2600MHz band if using a Bell Tower?

 

I see Telus has coverage in my city, but I don't know what part of their map represents the 2600MHz LTE band. It may be that they are receiving full access through another LTE band from Bell. The public mobile map provides no distinction between the frequencies. 

 

The reason I ask this rather odd question is because I saw mentioned in posts that Telus does not operate on 2600MHz for Bell towers (in a few cases, that information may be dated now).

 

TL;DR - There are Bell towers operating on 2600MHz near my house. Is there any reason that my 'future' phone, that supports FDD-LTE B1/B3/B5/B7/B8, will not connect to this?


I connect on 2600MHz Band 7 in St. John's, NL (Bell) with no trouble at all. Phone seems to prefer it when the signal is good .

Good Citizen / Bon Citoyen

Re: Network sharing explained!

Hi Sheytoon. So what I understand :  I have a Bell phone  with à Bell sim card. It simply search the 302-610 Bell signal.  So, both Bell and Telus towers, broadcast both codes. That's why my phone says that it receives "Bell" signal.

I live in Beauce where it's Telus RAN.  Correct me if it's not right :  I understand that the signal I receive is 100% from Telus and they take  my call  and direct it to  the "Bell" core network. So, there is no Bell stuff in the tower and no Bell signal. The only job is to bring my call to the Bell CN. Is that  right ??? Big TY for the answer.

Deputy Mayor / Adjoint au Maire

Re: Network sharing explained!

Hi @Bill1
You're absolutely correct! The towers are all Telus and they broadcast 302-220 and 302-610. So even though it's a Telus tower, it will transmit Telus + Bell signals. Your SIM will cause your phone to look for 302-610, and the tower will use that info to route/connect you to the Bell core network instead of the Telus core network.
Great Neighbour / Super Voisin

Re: Network sharing basics

@computergeek541 wrote:

@Indexx wrote:

Where does prioritization/throttling happen, and can there be discrimination between providers happening at the tower?


The carriers likely have the ability to prioritize any subcriber they see fit over another.  Whether they actually practice this to normal cusotmers during every-day use is a matter that they're not telling us about.

 

From what I'm reading, some cell phone companies do give priority access to certain customers under a protocal called Wireless Priority Service.  Some members of emercency response teams, government, and other essentially/critical services are given the ability to dial a code that forces the network to give the prioty user the next available slot on the network to place a call.  The document that I was looking at specifically only meantion 2G netowrk ability, so the information may be a bit out-of- date,  but clearly, some carriers do at least the ability to priotize voice calls.

 

At the time of the infromation at http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/et-tdu.nsf/eng/h_wj00016.html , only Rogers 2g and MTS cdma networks were providing WPS services,  but that information was as of 2011.


Wow, thanks the OP for sharing!

I worked in telco (wind/freedom, shaw, rogers and bell) in the management and data level. I can probably shed some light on the 'prioritization' subscribers mystery.  They can, and some do in fact prioritize the different type of subscribers. For example, business customers vs individual customers,  business accounts are definitely 'more important' due to liability concerns.  In terms of bandwidth and networking matters, I cannot say about the intricacy of how it works.  But I can tell you when a company 'merge' with another company, in this case with PM and Telus, it is not easy to just merge the two company/brand operations or transfer one to the other.  What they often do in terms of prioritization, they keep them separate, and build in the ability to assign different IMEI and SIM to link the hardware with the brand, and assign the type of subscribers accordingly, and the prioritization follows.  Regarding the signal towers, who owes the tower who has the power.  In Toronto for example, towers are mostly owned by Bell, Telus has their own but when Telus need to share Bell's towers... maybe networking wise they work the same, but the owner still has the upper hand, at least that's what I understood when I was seating in boardroom meetings during discussions on competition matters.  Having said that, there are regulations to control the sabotaging each other though. 

Deputy Mayor / Adjoint au Maire

Re: Network sharing basics

@ceciw,

 

Thanks for the information. Very interesting. Smiley Happy

Deputy Mayor / Adjoint au Maire

Re: Network sharing basics

@ceciw

Do you know which operators implement prioritization? What does prioritization mean exactly? Can you give some examples of how it would work? Are you referring to pre-emption or admission/congestion control? I'm very interested in getting details about this. From what I've seen in the RAN, there's nothing implemented to distinguish between any Bell or Telus subscribers. I am not sure about the core network, so that's why I'm asking.

Hmm
Great Citizen / Super Citoyen

Re: Network sharing basics

All the premium carriers participate in network prioritzation but most people probably won't notice it unless it adversely affects them or they'll dismiss it as a one off.